Gawker Media

Wikis > Gawker Media

Online media network focused on blogging, founded and owned by Nick Denton. Kotaku is its blog dedicated to video games.

 

Tax avoidance

Gawker Media was originally incorporated in Hungary, through which a large part of its international revenues were directed. In 2010 Gawker was “moved” to the Cayman Islands, a notorious tax haven. The New Yorker went as far as state “Gawker is organized like an international money-laundering operation.” [1]https://archive.today/94tUW

In a Gawker post attacking American CEOs for tax evasion, Gawker Media’s James Del, executive director of their internal ad department, posted a comment where he both confesses his company uses such schemes too and tries to spin it in a positive light [2]https://archive.today/Fs2Ah#selection-4867.0-4881.15 [3]https://archive.today/uwTxp. The notion regarding patriotism call back to Gawker’s previous stance on calling tax dodging unpatriotic [4]https://archive.today/xMn1M.


Sam Biddle

Sam Biddle, former editor for Gawker Media’s Valleywag blog and currently senior editor of the main blog Gawker, has several controversies to his name. Please see his page on this site for more information.


Partner list

Following the loss of Mercedes Benz as a partner, Gawker Media has removed the list of partnes from their site [5]https://archive.today/mVDqf.


Labor disputes

Gawker Media has been involved since June 2013 on a legal dispute with former interns, who claim they were classified as such solely for their employers to avoid paying them wages, which is a violation of federal law [6]https://archive.today/DUxQB. Since then, judges have ruled that a class action lawsuit is applicable [7]https://archive.today/ZuEuR, and that the plaintiffs can send notices about it to currently employed unapid interns [8]https://archive.today/N9RaR.


Kotaku

Please see Kotaku’s page in this site.


Yellow journalism

One of the most frequent accusations aimed at Gawker Media’s sites is the lack of quality of its supposed journalists, including reliance on clicbait, unethical behavior, sensationalism and in some cases illegal practices. Below is a list of egregious examples:

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